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Meyer Ambulance Service

1934 - 1976

 

1934      FOUNDING OF

 

1957

1957

 

1965

02 14       MEYER AMBULANCE RELOCATION

Plans to relocate from North First to West Main

The Meyer Ambulance Service, located in North First Street, plans to relocate and construct a new garage building to accommodate its ambulances and hearses, it was disclosed last night when Lloyd Meyer filed a request with the common council to have property at 800 West Main Street re-zoned to enable construction of a garage, 65 by 60 feet.  The plan would hinge on the re-zoning request.  The property in question is that of the late William (Bill) Mann.

 

06 03       MEYER AMBULANCE RELOCATION

Plans to relocate from North First to River Drive

Lloyd Meyer of the Meyer Ambulance Service who has been unsuccessful in his attempt to have a piece of property at 800 West Main Street rezoned to enable him to construct a garage and relocate his ambulance service, last night filed a petition with the common council to have the property at 1611 River Drive rezoned so he can erect a 40 by 60-foot garage on the site and locate his business there. In his petition he pointed out that the site adjoins the airport, that there is already a garage on the premises and that he proposes to erect a 40 by 60-foot garage which would be attached to the present garage and which would serve his business purposes.

 

07 14       MEYER AMBULANCE RELOCATED TO RIVER DRIVE

Lloyd Meyer announced that plans for the construction of a new garage to house his ambulance service in River Drive are being formulated and that he expects to be relocated in the new building by Sept. 1 or soon thereafter.  Mr. Meyer was given authority by the common council to relocate his business at its July 6 meeting when it approved the rezoning of the site on which he will build.  The Meyer Ambulance Service now located at 116-118 North First Street is housed in a building which in a past era served as headquarters for a widely known livery.

 

1965

02 14       MEYER AMBULANCE RELOCATION

Plans to relocate from North First to West Main

The Meyer Ambulance Service, located in North First Street, plans to relocate and construct a new garage building to accommodate its ambulances and hearses, it was disclosed last night when Lloyd Meyer filed a request with the common council to have property at 800 West Main Street re-zoned to enable construction of a garage, 65 by 60 feet.  The plan would hinge on the re-zoning request.  The property in question is that of the late William (Bill) Mann.

 

1967

02 14       PARKING LOT FOR MEYER PROPERTY

According to reports the plan to have the city attempt to acquire the two properties, directly north of the old city hall in North First Street for conversion into parking areas is expected to be revived in the near future.  The two properties in question include the Meyer Ambulance Service building, known earlier as the Krueger Livery Stable, and the former Jossi building, part of the Max Wolf Estate.  Directly north of the two properties is one of the city’s off-street parking lots, in which a parking gate was installed last year, rather than metering the lot.  By acquiring the two properties in question the city could double the present parking capacity in that section.

 

1976

END OF MEYER AMBULANCE SERVICE

  

      click to enlarge

 

The Meyer Ambulance Service of Watertown, located at 1611 River Drive, will close its business at the end of 1976, according to Lloyd (Dinty) Meyer, owner and operator.

 

Meyer has operated the service for over 42 years, and due to new regulations and restrictions regarding ambulance services he decided to dissolve that aspect of his business.

 

He said he will continue to provide his present services to funeral homes.  Meyer is bitter about the decision.  He feels the city and state forced him into the move by placing restrictions on his operation that he could not afford to meet. Among the regulations were that trained emergency medical technicians had to be employed, and that more extensive equipment had to be added to the vehicle.

 

“In all the years I’ve operated my service I’ve never turned down a call and I’ve never asked the city for a penny” - Lloyd (Dinty) Meyer, owner and operator, Meyer Ambulance Service of Watertown

 

2006

07 01       PAUL NOE, hearse driver

Although a certain type of person might cringe at the idea of driving a hearse for almost 50 years of their life, Paul Noe, 72, is not one of those people.  To him, it was an honor and a privilege to help serve the community.  “I never really treated it like a job, it was more of a service,” Noe, a retired firefighter, Army serviceman and as of this Friday, funeral driver, said.  “I enjoyed helping people when they needed it the most.”  He first got into the business in 1957 as a young man when his father-in-law asked Noe for help with his business, Meyer Ambulance Service.  If that sounds like an odd name, that’s because funeral companies were a full package deal in those days.

 

 

 

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