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Chickens

In city of Watertown

 

1871

02 08 CHICKEN STEALING

Evidently someone around in this section is eating a good deal of chicken meat. We hear complaints in all quarters about hen-roosts being pilfered. Mr. H. C. Joslin, of the 3rd ward, lost seventeen fine fowls last Friday, the scamps taking all he had but two. Acting on the theory, we suppose that two eggs a day are more of an aggravation than a comfort, Mr. Joslin authorizes us to say that the rascals can have the two remaining ones, by calling for them and no questions asked as he wishes to close out his stock and get out of the business. It seems that there are persons in this city who make a business of robbing hen-roosts, and a sharp look-out should be kept for these night-prowlers. Good steel traps, set around in the vicinity or hen-houses, would not be bad things in which to catch the thieves. WR

 

1899

10 03 CHICKENS KILLED

Fifty chickens belonging to William Staats, proprietor of a large hennery on Oconomowoc Avenue, were killed in some unknown manner during Wednesday night. Mr. Staats attributes his lost to a human depredator. Why is it that some people devoid of reason are continually venting their spite on innocent creatures? WR

 

1951

06 29 RAISE YOUR OWN MEAT

Rindfleisch Hatchery Farm Store, Corner Milwaukee and First streets

 

2012 PANEL SAYS CHICKENS OK IN CITY

07 10 The Watertown Plan Commission recommended changing a city ordinance Monday night to allow residents to keep chickens on their properties in the city.

 

Residents will be allowed to keep up to four chickens on detached single-family residences, according to the language in the ordinance. If someone renting property would like to raise chickens, they will need to get written consent from the property owner.

In the ordinance, prospective chicken owners must provide the chickens with a coop, a covered roosting area, and an adjacent chicken run, an enclosed area were chickens can walk and run.

 

Residents will have to apply and pay $10 for a license if they wish to raise chickens in the city.

 

The commission also recommended the ordinance be modified to say the chicken coop must be at least 15 feet away from all property lines instead of the 25 feet as was originally written to accommodate residents with smaller lots.

 

Other rules for keeping chickens include:

 

No roosters will be permitted.

The sale of chickens, chicken meat, eggs and other chicken products is prohibited.

The chicken coop cannot be larger than 32 square feet or taller than 10 feet.

The chicken run must be located next to the coop, not be larger than 64 square feet and the fence surrounding it must be between 48 and 96 inches tall.

Chickens are not permitted in garages, basements, attics or any other structures other than the coop and run on a property.

Guinea hens are prohibited.

 

The city will now hold a public hearing before the common council on Aug. 7 to get input from citizens.

 

http://www.wdtimes.com/news/local/article_b1278d7e-caa9-11e1-bc38-0019bb2963f4.html

 

 

 

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